TRUTH for January 2019

Truth.1901TRUTH for January 2019 is now available. We are thankful to Roger Campbell for his study of the Bible and his interest in helping others better to appreciate and know God’s Book. Will you please consider the four excellent studies for January. Listed below are the titles and first paragraphs of the four one-page articles found in TRUTH for January of 2019.

 

  1. Prophets of God in the First Century Church

Fulfilled Bible prophecy is evidence that the Bible’s message came from the mind of God. We thrill to read of the foretelling of the virgin birth of the Christ (Isaiah 7), the coming fall of Babylon (Isaiah 13), and the influential role of King Cyrus (Isaiah 44). Each of those memorable prophecies is found in the Old Testament. But what about prophets in the New Testament church? To read more download here: Truth1901.

  1. Lessons We Can Learn from David Sparing King Saul

King Saul was granted the privilege of being the first human king to rule over the nation of Israel. The message of 1 Samuel 18 shows how the relationship between Saul and a young man named David was soured. When Saul heard some in Israel praising David more than they praised the king himself, he was extremely upset. Saul was angry, he was afraid of David, he kept his eye on him, he counted David as an enemy, and more than once he tried to kill him. To put it mildly, in his dealings with David, Saul was not a very nice person. To study SEVEN lessons from this Bible account, download: Truth1901.

  1. Do You Find Worship Boring?

“Boring is defined as someone or something dull or uninteresting” [ http://www.yourdictionary.com ]. As humans, we find certain things and certain people interesting; at the same time, hearing someone discuss other topics may put us to sleep, as we have zero interest in those matters. To read more, download: Truth1901.

  1. 1 Corinthians 15.1-8—The Gospel

The theme of the fifteenth chapter of 1 Corinthians is “The Resurrection.” Paul writes about Jesus’ own resurrection from the dead, he notes the consequences which would follow if there were no resurrection, and he speaks of the future resurrection which will occur when the Christ comes again. To consider FIVE points from these verses, download: Truth1901.

He Marveled

mhsGraphics.LinesSqueezedFromALemmonsHE MARVELED is something Jesus did two times in the New Testament. Words are precious; words are interesting;  words instruct; words are valuable; words bless our lives (cf., Treasure in the Heart). Actually, words are indispensable for learning and receiving the will of the Lord and obeying it. We find the Greek word that is translated marvel used 46 times in the New Testament. A large number of those usages of the word are due to something Jesus did or said causing others to marvel. However, if I have correctly examined these 46 verses, there are two occasions in which Jesus, Himself, marveled at something. It is especially interesting to observe what a contrast these two occurrences provide.

He Marveled because of UNBELIEF…

First in one passage, Jesus is said to marvel at the unbelief of a group of people—Mark 6.6… And he marvelled because of their unbelief. And he went round about the villages, teaching. This incident takes place in the locale of Jesus’ growing up years, the small village of Nazareth. The people of Nazareth knew His trade, His mother, and the members of His earthly family (Mark 6.3).The unbelief of these Nazareth natives caused a sad result—Mark 6.5… And he could there do no mighty work, save that he laid his hands upon a few sick folk, and healed them. What a disappointment these people were to Jesus!

The word marvel comes from the Greek word, thaumazo. It is defined as follows: “to wonder or marvel at some event or object—‘to wonder, to be amazed, to marvel’ (whether the reaction is favorable or unfavorable depends on the context)” [Louw Nida]. The context clearly tells us here that Jesus’ marveling at the faith of the Nazareth folks was not in the category of favorable.

He Marveled because of GREAT Faith…

Second, there is the passage in Luke 7.1-10, where we find Jesus marveling at the GREAT FAITH of the centurion of Capernaum. Luke uses the word marvel here and in the parallel account Matthew also uses it (Mt 8.5-13). Since these are parallels, I count these two verses as one occasion of Jesus marveling.

What caused Jesus to be amazed were words from the mouth of the centurion. The words spoken by this Gentile officer in the forces of Herod Antipas were unlike any Jesus had heard, even among the Jews—Luke 7.9… When Jesus heard these things, he marvelled at him, and turned him about, and said unto the people that followed him, I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel. The words of the centurion which caused Jesus to marvel are recorded in verse 7… Wherefore neither thought I myself worthy to come unto thee: but say in a word, and my servant shall be healed. This Gentile soldier believed that Jesus had the ability to heal his servant simply by speaking the word. If Jesus would just say he was healed, he would be healed! That caused our Lord to marvel!

Great faith in one instance and great unbelief in the other caused Jesus to marvel. Have you ever thought about causing Jesus to MARVEL at your own faith?

Those souls at Nazareth had been greatly blessed in many ways to have Jesus as a resident. Mark 6.5 tells us that He did heal some sick people in Nazareth. Yet, at one point, they were ready to throw him off a cliff (Luke 4.28-30). How sad!

What could happen to the Lord’s church at Maple Hill if you and I develop within our hearts the kind of faith which would cause it to be said of Jesus: He Marveled?

Called of God–Questions to Consider

Walking in Truth: called of GodIn this radio program we consider the important question: “Have YOU been called of God?” This question pertains to a statement found in Acts 2.39. I sincerely believe that many people misunderstand and pervert this passage. I am using some material from the book: The Hub of the Bible, by J.D. Bales in this discussion.

There is a lot of confusion about being called of God which ought not to be so. The Bible is quite clear in its answers to all of the questions we could possibly come up with regarding God’s calling us. When we are content to allow the Bible to speak, our confusion over this matter quickly disappears. Let’s study this important topic by considering the pertinent Bible passages and let God’s Book guide us in answering the questions.

What Does it mean to be called of God?

Men must call upon God in order to attain salvation according to Acts 2.21. But men cannot call on God unless God first calls men. God calls all men, but only those who respond to His call and call on Him does He save. What does it mean for God to call men? How does God call us? Is the call irresistible? To what does God call us?

Questions answered in this Lesson on what it means to be called of God…

  1. What does CALL mean?
  2. Whom does the Lord call?
  3. How does the Lord call?
  4. Is the call of God irresistible?
  5. What happens to those who heed the call?
  6. From what and to what does God call us?From rebellion to obedience (Acts 2.23 + Acts 2.37-42).

1) From darkness to light (Col 1.13; 1 Peter 2.9).

2) From bondage to liberty (Gal 5.13).

3) From antagonism to fellowship (1 Cor 1.9).

4) To sanctification (1 Cor 1.2).

5) God called us by His own purpose and grace (2 Tim 1.9).

Here is the audio recording of our September 2, 2018 edition of Walking in Truth:

Tom House is Coming to Maple Hill

Tom House Gospel Meeting AnnouncementTom House is coming to Benton to preach a series of messages at Maple Hill. On Sunday, his plan is to preach a 3-part series entitled: “God is Our Refuge.” These messages he will preach on Sunday, September 23, at 10:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., and 7:30 p.m. During the week, on Monday night, September 24, at 7:00 p.m., Tom will present: “Trusting in the Faithfulness of God.” Finally, on Tuesday, September 25, at 7:00 p.m., the meeting concludes with: “They Shall Never Perish,” a study of John 10.27-28.

Who is Tom House?

Tom House is a graduate of Freed-Hardeman, and has been preaching the gospel for 50 years. He is working with the Plainview congregation in Fulton, Mississippi.

In the past Tom has worked in public service, having served as a police officer for the city of Fulton. He also has served as a Deputy Sheriff for Itawamba County. Significantly, his work there involved lecturing for the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Awareness program since 1982. He has presented that material to nearly 41,000 people. In 1993 citizens of the  town of Tremont, MS elected him as an alderman. He has served as president of the Tremont PTA and as president of Oakland Rural Community Development Council.

Finally, Tom House is also presently a full-time employee with the United States Postal service, with 31 years of service. If you want something good accomplished, call on a busy man. That is what we have done.

He is married to the former Nina Ruth James of Gadsden, TN. They have two children and four grandchildren.

We are quite confident that the messages Tom will preach will be biblical, edifying, and will produce great good. Our aim is to serve the church and our community with messages from the Bible that promote Christ-like living. Please come hear him preach and tell others about it as well. You can help us get the word out by sharing this post on social media, please. We plan to record the messages and make them available here.

 

Christian Living on Walking in Truth

Walking in Truth: Christian LivingIn this radio program we consider Christian living based upon the powerful question found in 2 Peter 3.11. How we ought to live is such a vital interest for anyone who is thinking clearly. The fact is that the Bible teaches us plainly that one day there is coming a judgment day, a last day (John 12.48). If I believe the Bible, I believe that Judgment Day is coming. When I read 2 Peter 3.11, I find Peter gives me an extremely important question to consider. According to the Bible (2 Peter 3.10), it is the case that on Judgment Day, God will bring to an end every single thing that has to do with physical life on this earth.

Why is Christian Living So Important?

In pondering Peter’s question, we are wise to adopt the idea of working for things that are eternal. Christian living and faithfulness to Christ, on that great Judgment Day, will rank highest on anyone’s list. Sadly, most will not begin seeing this until that day (Matthew 7.13-14)—which will be too late. Lots of things men now think are super important, on that day will be of zero importance. It will not just be Christians who acknowledge Jesus as Lord on that day.

One day the environmentalists will find that “mother earth,” he has so diligently sought to save will have been destroyed by the Lord. On that day all will recognize that God was in control of the earth and it could not be destroyed by man. Instead, God did it in a nanosecond.

Main Points of this Lesson on Christian living…

  1. I ought to live in the flesh, but NOT after the flesh (Rom 8.1-13; Gal 5.16-26).
  2. I ought to live in the world, but NOT of the world (Jn 15.18-19; 17.11-18; James 1.27; 4.4; 1 Jn 2.15-17).
  3. I ought to live as though the eyes of the world are ON ME, because THEY ARE (2 Cor 3.2).
  4. I ought to live as though God sees me BECAUSE HE DOES (Ps 139.1-12; Eccl 12.13-14; Heb 4.13; Lk 12.2; Num 32.23; 1 Timothy 5.24).
  5. I ought to live as though this were my last day on earth, because it may be (Job 14.1-2; 16.22; Eccl 12; James 4.13-15).

Here is our August 19, 2018 recording of Walking in Truth:

That Good Part–Priorities are Important

“That good part,” are words spoken by Jesus to Mary. Throughout the Bible we read about the choices that men and women, boys and girls make. Sometimes these choices are clearly held up to us as examples to follow and at other times it is obvious that we ought not make that given choice in our own lives. Consider an incident recorded in Luke 10:38-42—please read these verses.

Jesus said that Mary had chosen that good part.  So then, Jesus is pointing out a choice that is worthy of our consideration to follow in our own lives.

Significance of Mary’s Choice—That Good Part

What joy must Mary have felt! Her action brought about the words of her Lord that indicated His approval of a choice she had made!  For a faithful follower of Jesus could there be any greater delight than to know I have made a choice which is well pleasing to my Lord?  Can we not see that here is a very significant incident that Luke has recorded for our instruction?

The choice that Mary had made was to sit at Jesus’ feet and hear His word.  Now we would think that such a choice would be reckoned by all of Jesus’ disciples as a wise and good choice.  However, Mary’s sister, Martha had not so reckoned.  Martha, in fact, thought in her own mind that her sister had made a foolish choice.  Martha thought that Mary was being neglectful and was in need of rebuke from the Lord.

Instead, Jesus spoke a mild rebuke to Martha for her own misplaced priorities.  This brings to the mind of a careful Bible student that there could be many occasions on which Jesus might either question or commend choices we have made with regard to how we use our time.  I wonder how often we even consider this matter in our daily lives.

It is not as if Martha had chosen some ungodly pursuit with which to occupy her time.  Rather that which she was doing in showing hospitality is a good thing and quite often commended in Scripture (Romans 12:13; 1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:8; 1 Peter 4:9).  No, Martha had made a GOOD choice, what is troubling about her choice is that she might have made an even wiser choice–the choice made by her sister, Mary.  Mary had made a choice which recognized that the mundane things of this life become utterly insignificant when placed beside an opportunity for spiritual growth and understanding.  The Messiah was present!  Jesus, the Lord of glory (1 Corinthians 2:8), was in the building!  Is there not time to sit and listen to His teaching.

Application of Choosing That Good Part

What is the solution for the problems we face in our world today?  How do we cope with all of the unsettling and even upsetting news of the day?  Is there a lesson to learn from the visit Jesus made to that Bethany home?

Surely we need to examine our own priorities of life.  Surely we need to appreciate that we may be dwelling entirely too much upon those “Martha-things.” These things are good, in and of themselves. However, they may be hampering, even preventing,  our spiritual maturity and development into powerful servants of the Lord. After all, we surely want the Lord to use us in a mighty way.

How much time do I spend examining my priorities?  Do I ever even consider that there just might be a better use of my time?  Have I ever even considered that my Lord might have a commendation for me on Judgment day similar to the one He gave to Mary?

What about the Bible classes?  Is there a more direct comparison we could make than to consider this choice we make weekly?  What activity could my feeble mind conceive of that would take priority to listening to Jesus at Bible Class time?  If I want to choose THAT GOOD PART, where will I find myself at 10:00 on Sunday morning and 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday night? What about the worship assemblies?  Gospel meetings?  Vacation Bible School? It is shameful that we have differing numbers from the Sunday morning worship assembly count on these other occasions of study.  To those of you who do not come but are truly able to be here–are you being like Martha or are you being like Mary?  Think ahead for just a moment.  On that Judgment day of John 12:48, which person would you have to be your model?

The One Thing Needful: That Good Part

Jesus said to Martha, concerning her sister, Luke 10:42  “But one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her.”  We do not appreciate the one thing that is needful to the degree that it ought to be in our day.  That one thing that is needful seems to be “pushed off to the back burner” of our lives.  That one thing that is needful will make us a great church when we go and do likewise! Mary guides us in the right and good direction as she made the selection of THAT GOOD PART.

Faithfulness versus “Ashamed of My Words”

faithfulnessFaithfulness to abide in the doctrine of Christ will be rewarded by fellowship with God and Christ (2 John 1.9). Not to be faithful to the doctrine of Christ will cause us to be lost. In Luke 9.26 our Lord presents a strong warning which ought to be powerful enough to unsettle or humble even the most strident and pride-filled sinner! Christians likely need to consider the warning as well, because it is possible for you and me, in one way or another, to exhibit the shame our Lord condemns. The very idea of doing that for which Jesus gives this warning is entirely repulsive to any lover of truth, yet Satan presses us continually to do it. Listen to Jesus’ words—For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words, of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he shall come in his own glory, and in his Father’s, and of the holy angels.

DO NOT Be the Person Who Does not Value Faithfulness…

Who is the person Jesus will reject when He comes again? The person who is ashamed of Jesus and His words is that person. When Jesus comes in His glory is the time that He will be ashamed of such a person. This is a clear reference to His second coming. Elsewhere we are told that there is coming a future day in the which ALL men will be humbled to acknowledge that Jesus is King of kings and Lord of lords—1 Timothy 6.15… Which in his times he shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords.

That day is coming, but, sadly, it will be too late for the vast majority of those who have lived their lives on earth. All men do not make that acknowledgment at the present time. The fact of the matter is that MOST do not and will not make that acknowledgment. Jesus lets us know that such will always be the case—Matthew 7.13… Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat.

If someone rejects the words of Jesus now, and continues to do so unrepentantly, this same one faces JUDGMENT by those very words (John 12.48).

We think about the many examples the Old Testament provides of those who were not ashamed to be identified with God and His Word (cf., Romans 15.4). Those great examples–many of them mentioned in Hebrews 11–encourage us to “Stand Up for Jesus.” To learn from them and increase our courage is a great blessing.

David Serves Well as an Example of the Courage and Faithfulness WE Need…

Consider the incident in 1 Samuel 17 with young David [Dr. Floyd Jones in Chronology of the Old Testament, p. 94 suggests David’s age was 18-20]. Evidently he was the only Israelite sufficiently proud of God’s name and His people to risk battling Goliath. Goliath presented his challenge morning and evening for 40 days. (v. 16). The Bible tells us that The Philistine said… I defy the armies of Israel this day; give me a man, that we may fight together (v. 10). David recognized that the unanswered challenge of this uncircumcised Philistine was a reproach to Israel and was an act of defiance against the armies of the living God (v. 26). David told King Saul—let no man’s heart fail because of him; thy servant will go and fight with this Philistine (v. 32). David was not ashamed of his God and was confident that God would bless him with a great victory (v. 37), which He did (vv., 46-51). What a mighty victory David’s great courage produced!

Can we determine to allow David’s complete lack of shame for His God to be our stance? This will keep us away from following the example of his brethren who cowered in shame before Goliath. In our time, people disrespect the words of our Lord and castigate them to an alarming degree. It will likely be increasingly difficult to stand strong in the words of Christ without ridicule and opposition. Let us distinguish ourselves with the courage of David in giving our defense (1 Peter 3.15). Let us find ourselves NOT fitting the description Jesus warns about in Luke 9.30.

Faithfulness Will be Rewarded on Judgment Day!

We should consider Paul’s exhortation to Timothy—2 Timothy 2.10-12… Therefore I endure all things for the elect’s sakes, that they may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory. It is a faithful saying: For if we be dead with him, we shall also live with him: If we suffer, we shall also reign with him: if we deny him, he also will deny us. There is coming a day when the most important matter our hearts will consider is our own faithfulness to our Lord.

The reward for faithfulness will be GREAT. But, Satan would have you and me to be ashamed of Jesus. He smiles when we refuse to take a stand for truth. Satan wants us lost with him in hell forever and ever. That is our end if we are ashamed of the words of Jesus. Never should Jesus say of us:  that we have been ashamed of my words.

Consider studying also: Cain’s Complaint.

Book of John–A Study Guide

Book of John Study Guide

The New Testament Book of John is such an important and helpful book for our understanding of Jesus Christ. We are so thankful to have it in our Bibles. It is different from the other three accounts of the life of Christ (Matthew, Mark, and Luke). Those three Bible books are referred to by the scholars as “synoptic,” which means SEEING TOGETHER. It seems that Matthew was writing primarily with a Jewish audience in mind; Mark wrote to those of a Roman heritage; Luke to people with a Gentile background. We have created a 155-page study guide to aid in the study of this great book. You can reach it by clicking here: 4300sg.Combo

The Book of John seems fitting to all people. In the 1999 Annual Denton Lectures, Darrell Conley very capably summarizes the Book of John by describing briefly the nine miracles John records…

It is possible to outline and summarize the Book of John by his record of Jesus’ miracles. He does not record nearly all of the miracles that Christ did, and not as many as did Matthew, Mark, or Luke. But those that he does record are diverse and are sufficient for their purpose — to instill in us faith that Jesus is the Son of God and that so believing we might be saved eternally (John 20:30-31).

First Miracle

He writes of nine miracles Christ did as proof that He was Lord and God. The first miracle was that in Cana of Galilee — turning the water into wine (John 2:1-11). By this miracle Christ proved that He had authority over nature. And why should He not? He created all.

Second Miracle

His second miracle was the healing of the son of the nobleman or king’s officer (John 4:46-54). Even though the nobleman begged Him to come with him to Capernaum and heal his son, He would not go, but healed him at such a distance that it took the nobleman more than a day to reach home. He found his son recovered. Christ showed by this miracle that His power and authority extend everywhere.

Third miracle

The third miracle that the Book of John records is the healing of the infirm man (John 5:2-9). Even though it was the Sabbath day, and He was criticized for it, (John 5:16-18) he healed this man. He accomplished two things by this: He showed that He had authority over the Sabbath. “For the Son of man is lord of the sabbath” (Matt. 12:8). He showed that He was equal with God: “But Jesus answered them, My Father worketh even until now, and I work. For this cause therefore the Jews sought the more to kill him, because he not only brake the sabbath, but also called God his own Father, making himself equal with God” (John 5:17-18).

Fourth Miracle

John next tells about the miraculous feeding of the five thousand (John 6:1-14). Multitudes had followed Jesus to the eastern side of the Sea of Galilee, and they had nowhere to buy food. Jesus, showing his feeling for their human needs, had them sit on the grass and, taking five loaves and two fishes, He fed 5,000 men. Afterward they gathered up of the leftover pieces twelve baskets. By this miracle Jesus shows His sympathy for the human condition and needs of mankind.

Fifth Miracle

In the next miracle in John (John 6:16-21), when the evening comes, Jesus walked on the sea in the midst of a storm to the place where the disciples were in a boat. By this miracle Jesus shows His authority and control over nature and the elements of this world.

Sixth Miracle

The whole of John 9 is taken up with the sixth miracle of Jesus, chosen by the Holy Spirit to be included in John’s account. By the public healing of this man born blind, who was known to all, he showed that He, as Lord of Heaven and earth, had authority and power over all sickness and affliction. What a contrast between this genuine miracle of Christ and fraudulent “miracles” of modern so-called healers, who “heal” things that no one can see, in their own places, and usually people that no one knows or hears from again, from places that are far away!

Seventh Miracle

The seventh miracle recorded in the Book of John is the most dramatic to this point: the raising of Lazarus from the dead (John 11:39-44), which should not surprise us. He who gave us life to begin with, Who came to this world in order that we might have eternal life, should certainly be able to raise one from the dead. Although Lazarus had to face death again, one day the righteous shall arise from the dead to eternal life. “Marvel not at this: for the hour cometh, in which all that are in the tombs shall hear his voice, and shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of judgment” (John 5:28-29). By this miracle He showed that He had authority over life and death.

Eighth Miracle

Surely the climactic miracle of all in the Book of John is the resurrection of Jesus Christ. It is the eighth miracle discussed by John (John 20:1-9). By this miracle Jesus proves to all unprejudiced, open-minded people, for all time, that He is the Christ, the Son of the Living God.

Ninth Miracle

The ninth miracle John records is the great catch of fish upon the command of Jesus (John 21:1-12). Although this may seem like an anti-climax considering the other miracles that John has written in his book, this miracle accomplishes a very important purpose — it identifies the risen Jesus with the One that had been with the apostles the previous three and one-half years. John recognized Him after the miracle. “That disciple therefore whom Jesus loved saith unto Peter, It is the Lord” (John 21:7). He is the same always: “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today, yea and for ever” (Heb. 13:8).

Meet Temptation with Christ

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In Luke 4.1-13 we have the record of Jesus being tempted of Satan. Though He was tempted, He never yielded to temptation (Hebrews 4.15). What a marvelous example we have to follow: our Lord Jesus Christ (1 Peter 2.21)! We ought often to thank God for this blessing.

We will not fare as well as did our Lord in meeting temptation (Romans 3.23). However, we do have the ability to resist temptation and we CAN be successful in our battle with Satan and S-I-N! Three points should make this clear to us. Please study the references attached to these points…

  1. We have a HEAVENLY EXAMPLE (Luke 4.1-13).
  2. We have a HEAVENLY ASSURANCE (1 Corinthians 10.13).
  3. We have a HEAVENLY PRESCRIPTION–Revelation 3.10. The saints at Philadelphia were commended by the Lord. They had kept His word of PATIENCE. That word means: “to continue to bear up despite difficulty and suffering … to put up with…” [Louw-Nida]. God’s Word is that which makes it possible to resist temptation (Psalm 119.11).

An “entire alphabet of help” (26 total) from Scripture to resist temptation…

In order to meet temptation with Christ, we must. . .

  • A.  “Keep the word of Christ’s patience” (Rev 3:10).
  • B.  Know the Bible (Psalms 119:11).
  • C.  Be godly (2 Peter 2:9).
  • D.  Look for the way to escape temptation (1 Corinthians 10:13).
  • E.  Remember Lot’s wife (Luke 17:32).
  • F.  Use the “Spiritual EPA” (Philippians 4:8).
  • G.  Follow the Example of Jesus (Matthew 4:1-11).
  • H.  Pray (Matthew 26:41).
  • I.   KNOW that we are ABLE to resist (1 Corinthians 10:13).
  • J.  Don’t allow temptations to discourage and then destroy (1 Peter 5:6-7).
  • K.  Refuse to allow Satan to create doubt in your mind about what God has said or what He really means (Genesis 3:4-5).
  • L.   Refuse to believe Satan’s lie that something good will come from doing something evil (Genesis 3:4-5).
  • M. Do not allow Satan to use your God-given ability to envision, visualize, and fantasize to create a picture of the pleasure of sin–these pleasures are ONLY for a season (Genesis 3:4-5; Hebrews 11:25).
  • N.   Remember that when God says NO to something it is NOT to diminish your pleasure, but to ENHANCE it (John 10:10).
  • O.  Remember this world is not your home (1 Peter 1:17).
  • P.   Think about the NEW ways God can use you as you choose not to yield to temptation (Hebrews 11).
  • Q.  THINK about how much might be riding on the decision you are about to make (Matthew 16:26).
  • R.   Realize that it is OK to be angry about SIN (John 2:13; Mark 3:5)–Personalize the enemy:  SATAN.
  • S.  Beware of your STRENGTHS (1 Corinthians 10:12).
  • T.  Shift your energy from preoccupation with life’s inconveniences and your own pain to GOING TO WORK FOR THE LORD–Put on the Lord Jesus (Romans 13:14).
  • U.   Know that the way out of temptation is THROUGH it–Patiently endure it and do so with JOY (James 1:2).
  • V.  Understand that the Bible speaks of SINS OF IMAGINING (e.g., Matthew 5:27-28).
  • W. Do not waste time devising evil plans or making provision for the flesh, BUT rather put on the Lord Jesus (Romans 13:14).
  • X.  Do not forget about the OMNISCIENCE OF GOD–Some day all that you thought was secret and hidden will be made manifest and made known (Luke 8:17).
  • Y.  Appreciate and use the DISCERNING POWER OF GOD’S WORD (Hebrews 4:12).
  • Z.   Bring every thought into captivity to the obedience of Christ (2 Corinthians 10:5).

Life on this earth is filled with trials, temptations, and disappointments. In order to live the best way it is possible to live here, we must be determined to:  MEET TEMPTATION WITH CHRIST.

Properly Observing

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What an important chapter Mark 15 is! We need often to read it and the parallels. We need often to go to the cross. It will help us to be better people. Below we are placing an outline of the chapter which also gives the parallels from the other three accounts of the life of Christ (taken from NKJV headings)…

  1. Pilate Tries Jesus (Mark 15.1-14; Matthew 27.1-2; Matthew 27.11-23; Luke 23.1-5; Luke 23.13-23; John 18.28—19.15).
  2. Jesus is Beaten (Mark 15.15-23; Matthew 27.26-34; Luke 23.24-32; John 19.16-22).
  3. Jesus is Crucified (Mark 15.24-41; Matthew 27. 35-56; Luke 23.33-39; John 19.18; John 19.23-30).
  4. Jesus is Buried (Mark 15.42-47; Matthew 27.57-61; Luke 23.50-55; John 19.38-42).

I have pasted in my Bible a clipping from some bulletin somewhere. I have seen it many places over the years. I do not know who originated it. I first remember seeing it back in the early 1980s. It is designed as a HELP IN PROPERLY OBSERVING THE LORD’s SUPPER. It focuses on numbers related to the cross, thus it is related to the material recorded in Mark 15 and the parallel renderings listed above. I hope it may be of help in some way to focusing the mind in the proper direction to observe properly the simple memorial Jesus has included in the worship of the church.

THE LORD’S SUPPER…

  1. There is ONE Lord (John 14.6). Who is the Lord of YOUR life?
  2. There were TWO thieves (Luke 23.39-43). Which might you have been?
  3. There were THREE crosses. One thief a REBELLER (Luke 23.39). One thief a REPENTER (Luke 23.40). And there was Christ, the REDEEMER (1 Peter 1.18-19).
  4. There were FOUR parts of Jesus’ garment, and a prophecy  (John 19.23-24).
  5. There were FIVE wounds (John 19.34). Remember the pain.
  6. There were SIX hours (our time) of crucifixion (Mark 15.25-37). Remember the suffering.
  7. There were SEVEN sayings on the cross
    1. Luke 23.34… Forgiveness
    2. Luke 23.43… Salvation
    3. John 19.26-27… Compassion
    4. John 19.28… Suffering
    5. Matthew 27.46… Loneliness
    6. John 19.30… Victory
    7. Luke 23.46… Tremendous Trust