Study Guides for 1 Peter

The Apostle Peter obviously has concern for his brethren and wants to motivate them faithfully to endure persecution which will surely come (if not already present).  His powerfully persuasive arguments should provide a strength to saints of all ages!  He attempts to help the brethren to appreciate more their own salvation by showing others (prophets & angels) had/have great interest in it.  We are urged to prepare for meeting temptations and persecutions and to keep it in perspective that these sufferings are only temporary.  He takes us to the Cross to remind us of the great cost of our salvation.  He reminds us of the importance of having sincere love of our brethren, who have so many things in common with us.

“The basic message of 1 Peter concerns suffering. It is obvious that the people to whom it was written were suffering because of their faith in Jesus Christ. Undoubtedly, this persecution took many different forms. We know that some of what they were subjected to involved being falsely charged with evil (1 Pet. 2:11-12). Those who have been wrongly accused of something know that it is not easy to endure. False accusations take a great toll on one emotionally. However, it seems that their suffering involved more than mere talk, for Peter calls it a “fiery trial” that was testing their faith (1 Pet. 4:12). One of the things Peter sets out to do in this epistle is to instruct God’s people on how to handle persecution. They must not react by retaliating (1 Pet. 2:21-25; 3:9), nor should they justify their adversaries by engaging in the things of which they are being accused (1 Pet. 4:15-16). Rather, he says, they must “put to silence the ignorance of foolish men” (1 Pet. 2:11-16) by living pure lives that do not justify the slander. Also, he says they should rejoice that they are suffering because they are Christians (1 Pet. 4:13).

“Not only is Peter instructing them on how to deal with suffering for the sake of one’s affiliation with Jesus, but above all else he teaches them that they must remain faithful to the very faith that is bringing the persecution. This is a high price to pay, and, undoubtedly, a price they had not counted on when they became disciples.

“If people are asked to pay a price, they must be convinced that what they are getting is worth the price they are paying. In this way 1 Pet. 1:1-12 fits into the persecution theme of this letter. These words are Peter’s effort to convince his readers that the Christian faith is worth holding on to despite their suffering. What does Peter tell them about Christianity that makes it worth suffering for? He tells them about the future hope they have as Christians (1 Pet. 1:3-4). Then, he tells them that their present trials will serve to prove that their faith is genuine (1 Pet. 1:5-9). Finally, he looks at Christianity from the past (1 Pet. 1:10-12). The prophets and even the angels were greatly interested in the faith they have had the honor of receiving.” [Gene Burgett, in Studies in 1 Peter, 2 Peter, and Jude, Edited by Dub McClish, 17th Annual Denton Lectures, 1998, p. 29].

In combination with our radio program WALKING IN TRUTH, we produced study guides for the 260 chapters of the New Testament. We will be posting those study guides in the coming days to this site. If you benefit from these study guides will you please spread the word on social media by using the links below this post?

Chapter 1… 6001sg

Chapter 2… 6002sg

Chapter 3… 6003sg

Chapter 4… 6004sg

Chapter 5… 6005sg

All five chapters in one file… 6000sgCombo

 

Author: David Lemmons

Preacher for Maple Hill Church of Christ near Benton, KY. Married to Diane for 44 years. Father of Heather, Aaron, and Rachel. Grandfather of Maverick, Serenity, and Cannon.

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