Singing is God’s Choice for Worship

Singing and a SloshingBucket

Singing in worship is a topic that needs honest discussion and careful study. God intended singing to be an important part of our worship. I think it was at a Preachers’ Meeting in Greenfield, TN that I heard Lee Davis use the expression something like: “There’s not enough water in that argument to slosh in a bucket.” I believe that was the first time I had heard this expression. Lee indicated at the time that it was not original with him. Of course the idea of the statement is that the argument was WEAK. Lee was saying that a conclusion had been drawn without adequate support from the evidence presented.

There is certainly a danger in “jumping to conclusions” in any area of life. Many things have been said, no doubt, between husbands and wives and in all other relationships which fall in this category. Such is especially dangerous and foolish when it involves spiritual matters, (i.e., teaching from God’s word). I subscribe to the fact that every Bible expositor needs to follow the “Law of Rationality.” I can recall hearing Roy C. Deaver cite and define this law numerous times. The “Law of Rationality” goes something like this: We must never assign to any proposition or claim any more weight than is absolutely demanded from the evidence presented.

As we teach, all of us ought to strive with the greatest of diligence to avoid transgressing “The Law of Rationality.” The reason being that we are urged to use such care and caution in dealing with Scripture in numerous places in God’s word (Acts 17.11; Ephesians 5.6-10; 1 Thessalonians 5.21; 2 Timothy 2.15; 1 John 4.1). It really does our cause no benefit to draw conclusions which do not have the support of Bible evidence. Additionally, we need to realize that there are millions of examples of argumentation which doesn’t contain enough water to slosh in a bucket.

Let us never be swayed into action by anything but TRUTH, which can stand on its own without the props of extended hyperbole and “needs-based” arguments. Our Bibles are quite sufficient to guide us as we properly weigh and try arguments that are set before us.

I would like to challenge you to read and study about the kind of music that is authorized for worship in the New Testament. May I suggest a good article? Please check what Allen Webster wrote in HTH, Volume 18 #5. Also, please take the time to read and study these ten articles about singing by clicking here: ChristianWorker1107

Properly Observing

pexels-photo-208315
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

What an important chapter Mark 15 is! We need often to read it and the parallels. We need often to go to the cross. It will help us to be better people. Below we are placing an outline of the chapter which also gives the parallels from the other three accounts of the life of Christ (taken from NKJV headings)…

  1. Pilate Tries Jesus (Mark 15.1-14; Matthew 27.1-2; Matthew 27.11-23; Luke 23.1-5; Luke 23.13-23; John 18.28—19.15).
  2. Jesus is Beaten (Mark 15.15-23; Matthew 27.26-34; Luke 23.24-32; John 19.16-22).
  3. Jesus is Crucified (Mark 15.24-41; Matthew 27. 35-56; Luke 23.33-39; John 19.18; John 19.23-30).
  4. Jesus is Buried (Mark 15.42-47; Matthew 27.57-61; Luke 23.50-55; John 19.38-42).

I have pasted in my Bible a clipping from some bulletin somewhere. I have seen it many places over the years. I do not know who originated it. I first remember seeing it back in the early 1980s. It is designed as a HELP IN PROPERLY OBSERVING THE LORD’s SUPPER. It focuses on numbers related to the cross, thus it is related to the material recorded in Mark 15 and the parallel renderings listed above. I hope it may be of help in some way to focusing the mind in the proper direction to observe properly the simple memorial Jesus has included in the worship of the church.

THE LORD’S SUPPER…

  1. There is ONE Lord (John 14.6). Who is the Lord of YOUR life?
  2. There were TWO thieves (Luke 23.39-43). Which might you have been?
  3. There were THREE crosses. One thief a REBELLER (Luke 23.39). One thief a REPENTER (Luke 23.40). And there was Christ, the REDEEMER (1 Peter 1.18-19).
  4. There were FOUR parts of Jesus’ garment, and a prophecy  (John 19.23-24).
  5. There were FIVE wounds (John 19.34). Remember the pain.
  6. There were SIX hours (our time) of crucifixion (Mark 15.25-37). Remember the suffering.
  7. There were SEVEN sayings on the cross
    1. Luke 23.34… Forgiveness
    2. Luke 23.43… Salvation
    3. John 19.26-27… Compassion
    4. John 19.28… Suffering
    5. Matthew 27.46… Loneliness
    6. John 19.30… Victory
    7. Luke 23.46… Tremendous Trust

Children in Worship

singingby Lester Kamp

My Source: GLAD TIDINGS OF GOOD THINGS, Volume 4, August 6, 1998

One of our main goals in life is to help our children and other young people to become Christians who are faithful to God’s Word and active in His kingdom, the church. We want to “bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord” (Eph 6:4). We want them to know the joy of knowing, serving, and worshipping the Lord. Our children should be taught why we worship, how we worship, and how to make our worship most effective. Parents, grandparents, and friends will be the most important influences on our young people in their worship. Here are a few ideas that will help us train our children to be good worshippers.

ONE—–SET A GOOD EXAMPLE
Children need to see your worship and the joy it brings to your life. You need to come to the worship assemblies regularly with an attitude of joy and anticipation–not with a sense of drudgery or obligation. You need to sing, bow in prayer, listen intently to the sermon, give joyfully, and partake of the Lord’s Supper meditatively. Children will follow your example, so set the right kind.

TWO—–PREPARE THE CHILD
Before Sunday, talk to your child about how to act in the assembly. Tell the child why we pray, sing, give, partake of the Lord’s Supper weekly, and listen to a sermon. As you would in preparing him for school, make sure the child gets enough rest the night before to be awake and alert Sunday.

THREE—–INVOLVE THE CHILD
When singing, help him locate the page of the song. With your finger on his book, point to the words as we sing. Encourage your child to sing even though he may not always sing the right words. When the sermon is delivered, help the child locate the Scriptures cited and/or encourage him to write them down. This impresses upon the child the importance of paying attention. It also stresses that worship is active and not passive.

FOUR—–AVOID DISTURBANCES
Make sure that your child has gone to the restroom and for a drink of water before the worship service begins. Traffic in and out of the auditorium during worship is both unnecessary (with but a few exceptions) and disruptive to the worship of many.

FIVE—–SIT UP TOWARD THE FRONT
Don’t follow the natural tendency to sit in the back so that the child does not disturb others. Think positively. Sit close to the front so that your child can see and hear what is happening. You’ll be amazed at how much better he will behave when you sit toward the front, and how much more meaningful worship will be to you, too.

SIX—–FOLLOW THROUGH
Reinforce your child’s learning by discussing various aspects of the worship period afterwards.

SEVEN—–BE PATIENT
Children will not act like adults, but with patience and love, they can be taught to love God and worship Him from the heart.

This process will take time, but it will be time well spent. The time to begin is now, regardless of how young your child is.